Implementation

At Thomas Jones we are following the White Rose scheme of learning which has been recommended by the Department for Education as, ‘fully delivering a mastery approach’[1]. The White Rose mastery approach is simple and allows children to use concrete, pictorial and abstract representations to help build their understanding of mathematical concepts. We encourage our children to use a variety of concrete objects such as Base 10 blocks and Ten-Frames to build a foundation of understanding in mathematics in all years, before deepening and consolidating through the use of written calculations and problems.

Children begin every year by consolidating concepts from the previous year with a focus on Place Value and Number. A large emphasis is placed on number skills to ensure children can add, subtract, multiply and divide using mental and written methods. Children are encouraged from year one to learn vital multiplication and division facts. Evolving from this, we develop children’s mathematical thinking and reasoning skills through problem-solving and context-driven teaching.

Consistent progression in mathematics is essential and our ‘Progression of Skills and Understanding’ document clearly outlines how children will develop year-on-year. Here is an example for addition and subtraction and how the skill progresses through the school:

maths-progression-table.png

Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS)

Children will work towards the Department for Education’s non-statutory Early Learning Goals[2] through short mathematics sessions to ensure children are best-set for the demands of the National Curriculum. These are separated into ‘Numbers’ and ‘Shape, Space and Measures’. The Early Learning Goals are outlined in our ‘Progression of Skills and Understanding’ document.

Although there are short daily mathematics sessions led by the teacher and follow up adult led activities, often mathematics is taught discretely through play and child-led activities. Learning opportunities for mathematics are planned for both inside and outside the classroom, and these link where possible to the weekly learning intentions as well as the children’s interests. These could include counting how many scoops of water are needed to fill different size containers, writing numerals in large scale using chalk or solving problems through play such as which container fits the most farm animals to transport them around the farm.

Teaching staff in the EYFS have a strong understanding of effective strategies for the teaching of early mathematics. The mathematics curriculum is designed to help children embed their learning in order to integrate new knowledge and larger concepts. Teaching staff are trained in checking children’s learning and understanding, through questioning and formative assessment methods. Through this engagement with children, all staff are then able to provide suitable scaffolding or extension to support children in consolidating their learning of key mathematical concepts or challenging them further so that they reach their individual potential. At this stage recording mathematical thinking is encouraged whether this is pictorial, with numbers or more formal written methods. At all times mathematical language and new vocabulary is prioritised.

Key Stage One

Fluency is a vital component of Key Stage One mathematics. Children work with number and the main four operations to ensure that they become confident with number facts and calculations. Teaching uses a range of concrete, pictorial and abstract approaches to build children’s understanding to a point where they can use mathematics skills to independently approach a range of context-driven problems.

 

Year One

Year Two

Autumn term

Place Value

Addition and Subtraction

Shape

Place Value

Addition and Subtraction

Money

Multiplication and Division

Spring term

Addition and Subtraction

Place Value

Measurement

Multiplication and Division

Statistics

Properties of Shape

Fractions

Summer term

Multiplication and Division

Fractions

Position and Direction

Place Value

Money

Time

Measurement

Position and Direction

Time

Problem Solving

 

Lower Key Stage Two (Years Three and Four)

Fluency is still at the heart of mathematics teaching in Lower Key Stage Two, ensuring children can quickly recall facts and work out problems involving number and the four main operations. Children will develop efficient written and mental methods and be able to calculate accurately with large whole numbers.

 

Year Three

Year Four

Autumn

Place Value

Addition and Subtraction

Multiplication and Division

Place Value

Addition and Subtraction

Measurement

Multiplication and Division

Spring

Multiplication and Division

Money

Statistics

Measurement

Fractions

Multiplication and Division

Measurement

Fractions

Decimals

Summer

Fractions

Time

Properties of Shape

Measurement

Decimals

Money

Time

Statistics

Properties of Shape

Position and Direction

 

Upper Key Stage Two (Years Five and Six)

This is a period of consolidation and extension of concepts children will have mastered in previous years. Children will develop an understanding of connection between numbers and concepts not only with multiplication, division and whole numbers but also with decimals, fractions, ratio and percentage. Emphasis is placed through reasoning on multi-step words problems and strategies to break these down and work them out.

 

Year Five

Year Six

Autumn

Place Value

Addition and Subtraction

Statistics

Multiplication and Division

Measurement

Place Value

Addition and Subtraction

Multiplication and Division

Fractions

Position and Direction

Spring

Multiplication and Division

Fractions

Decimals and Percentages

Decimals

Percentages

Algebra

Measurements including Conversions and Volume

Ratio

Statistics

Summer

Decimals

Properties of Shape

Position and Direction

Measurements including Conversions and Volume

Properties of Shape

Consolidation and SATs Preparation

 

[1] https://whiterosemaths.com/resources/

[2] https://www.foundationyears.org.uk/files/2012/03/Early_Years_Outcomes.pdf